Trivia fotográfica FSMEX

#4
Pues si y no es un DC-3. Al menos este de la foto aparece asi:

Aircraft: Lisunov Li-2T
Aircraft Generic: Lisunov Li-2/3
Airline: Sunflower (Gold Timer Foundation)
Registration: HA-LIX
CN: 18433209
Code: N/A

Mas datos:

[4] SOVIET LISUNOV LI-2 / JAPANESE SHOWA L2D

* The Soviets manufactured almost three thousand DC-3 variants under license. They were built under the direction of Boris Lisunov, who had acquired his education in putting together the aircraft at the Douglas Santa Monica plant during a stint there from 1936 through 1939. The type went into production as the "PS-84", meaning "Passenger Aircraft from State Factory (GAZ) 84", and was in principle to be used as a civilian airliner by Aeroflot. After the Nazi invasion of June 1941, GAZ-84 relocated to Tashkent in Central Asia, and the aircraft acquired the military designation "Li-2".

Although the Soviet plan had been to avoid changes in the design, many tweaky modifications were incorporated in the Lisunov-built machines. The Li-2s featured:


A slightly smaller span.

Provisions for ski landing gear.

Structural reinforcement and thicker skin for vulnerable sections of the airframe.

Some rearrangements of windows.

The main passenger door on the right.

Soviet-built radial engines. Sources differ maddeningly on exactly which engines, but one prominent powerplant was the Shvetsov ASh-62, a 9 cylinder radial with 746 kW (1,000 HP). Apparently, the power ratings of Soviet engine fits to the Li-2 lagged those of Western C-47s and the Li-2's performance lagged accordingly.
Li-2 variants included:

Li-2P: Basic civil passenger model.

Li-2G: Basic civil cargo hauler, with reinforced floor and tie-downs, plus cargo doors on the left.

Li-2PG: Civil convertible passenger-cargo version.

Li-2T: Militarized Li-2G, with a capacity of 20 troops or 15 stretchers along with the crew of four. Some were fitted with a dorsal turret with either a ShKAS 7.62 millimeter (0.30 caliber) or UBT 12.7 millimeter (0.50 caliber) machine gun, and a ShKAS machine gun could be fitted to a flexible mount on each side of the aircraft. Bomb racks could be fitted under the fuselage, with typical carriage consisting of four FAB-250 250 kilogram (550 pound) bombs, and six RS-82 82 millimeter (3.2 inch) unguided rockets could be carried under each outer wing.

Li-2D: Paratrooper version of the Li-2T, with a glider tow hook and paratrooper kit. Late models had a glazed front left crew door with a bulged window to allow observation of parachute drops. A long-range "Li-2DB" variant was built, with additional fuel tanks.

Li-2R: Survey or "reconnaissance" version, with bulged windows behind the cockpit.

Li-2V: Postwar version with turbocharged engines, used for Artic meteorological work.
In the postwar period, the Li-2 was given the NATO codename "Cab". The career of the DC-3 / C-47 wearing the Red Star remains very obscure in the West and such details as are available tend towards the contrary and untrustworthy. Hopefully more information will be available in the future.

* Very surprisingly, DC-3s were also built in Japan during the war. Two Japanese trading firms, Mitsui and Far Eastern Trading, bought a total of 20 Douglas-built DC-3s, which went into service with Dai Nippon Air Lines and served through the war.

In 1938, Mitsui went on to obtain a manufacturing license for $90,000 USD in 1938, not bothering to tell Douglas that they were doing so at the request of the Imperial Japanese Navy. Mitsui obtained all specifications, and then also bought two unassembled DC-3s from Douglas as manufacturing pattern machines. Mitsui arranged delivery of the unassembled machines to the Showa company, which was to cooperate with Nakajima for manufacture.

The two unassembled DC-3s were put together by Showa and delivered in October 1939 and April 1940, with the designation "L2D1". In the meantime, Showa and Nakajima had been working to modify the design to use 764 kW (1,000 HP) Mitsubishi Kinsei 43 radials in place of the US-built engines, This resulted in the first Japanese production variant, the "L2D2". Nakajima built 71 of this model, delivering the last in November 1942, when the company got out the business of building DC-3 clones.

However, Showa remained in the trade, and in fact the Imperial Japanese Navy selected the type as their standard transport aircraft. Showa delivered their first L2D2 in March 1941, quickly moving on to improved variants.

The "L2D2-1" was a cargo hauler, with a reinforced floor and cargo doors on the left side of the rear fuselage. The "L2D3" was an improved passenger version, with Kinsei 51 radials providing 970 kW (1,300 HP) each and cockpit windows distinctively extended back along the fuselage. An equivalent cargo version, the "L2D3-1", was also built. Both these variants were later built with improved Kinsei 53 engines, also with 970 kW (1,300 HP), and designated "L2D3a" and "L2D3-1a" respectively.

The "L2D4" was an armed variant, with a top gun position mounting a single 13 millimeter gun, and a single 7.9 millimeter gun firing from a hatch on each side of the aircraft. The "L2D4-1" was the cargo transport equivalent. Neither went beyond prototypes. The last in the series, the "L2D5", was basically an L2D4 that was designed to be built with as much non-strategic materials (wood and steel version aircraft alloys) and powered by Kinsei 62 radials, with 1,165 kW (1,560 HP) each, but the prototype was not completed before the end of the Pacific War.

Showa built a total of 416 L2Ds, in addition to the 71 built by Nakajima. The L2D was codenamed "Tabby" by the Allies. It created a degree of confusion that apparently led to some deadly "friendly fire" incidents.

Fuentes: http://www.airliners.net/open.file/1231996/L/ y mas informacion en: http://www.faqs.org/docs/air/avc47.html

Saludos
 
#5
Helios dijo:
Pues si y no es un DC-3. Al menos este de la foto aparece asi:
Aircraft: Lisunov Li-2T
Aircraft Generic: Lisunov Li-2/3
Airline: Sunflower (Gold Timer Foundation)
Registration: HA-LIX
CN: 18433209
Code: N/A
Te la sacasteeeee!! Yo hubiese apostado uno de "esos" (un dedo) a que era un DC3!!! Salvaste mi fisonomia!! Gracias!
 
#6
Pues si y no es un DC-3. Al menos este de la foto aparece asi:

Aircraft: Lisunov Li-2T
Aircraft Generic: Lisunov Li-2/3
Airline: Sunflower (Gold Timer Foundation)
Registration: HA-LIX
CN: 18433209
Code: N/A
Efectivamente!, es un Lisunov Li-2

Era una pregunta con trampa, la forma de diferenciarlos del DC-3 es la ventanita extra de la cabina a cada lado del avion.
 
#8
¿Que no Helios debería poner la siguiente foto?

En otros foros donde participo al menos así son las trivias: se hace una pregunta, el que la responda y sepa que está en lo correcto espera la confirmación de quien la hizo para que si acertó, entonces hacer la siguiente pregunta, y así... :roll:
 

Dream Liner

Well-Known Member
#9
Cougar222 dijo:
Efectivamente!, es un Lisunov Li-2

Era una pregunta con trampa, la forma de diferenciarlos del DC-3 es la ventanita extra de la cabina a cada lado del avion.
Pues yo por eso ni le intenté, me pareció la respuesta demasiado obvia como para ser verdad.

Buena trivia sin duda. Siempre se aprende algo nuevo.

Saludos

Dream Liner 7E7
 
#10
Dream liner escribio:
Pues yo por eso ni le intenté, me pareció la respuesta demasiado obvia como para ser verdad.
Buena trivia sin duda. Siempre se aprende algo nuevo.
Lo mismo pense: ese modelo esta DEMASIADO facil de reconocer (fuera el colmo que alguien no se lo supiera! :wink: ), a solo que fuera una variacion.
Hay muchos modelos norteamericanos de la era de la segunda guerra mundial que fueron copiados/exportados en Inglaterra, CHina y Rusia, entre otros paises.
 

XA-CMF

Super Moderator
#12
Bueno, hagamos mas activa esta dinamica, y si, quien adivine pone la siguiente, pero como Helios no se aparece pues me atrevo a poner la siguiente... un poco mas dificil.....

 
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