Accidente Lear Jet 35 XA-USD al sur de la florida

OleaPilot

Active Member
Ojalá la NTSB pueda esclarecer las causas de este lamentable accidente y no estoy tan seguro de que el USD cuenta con CVR lo más seguro es que no ....
 

Dallas

New Member
Es una pena! Esperemos que se encuentre la cause del accidente y todos aprendamos de esto….(ojo DGAC).. Este modelo de LEAR JET cuenta con un (SB) boletín de servicio para la columna de control.. Se tiene que renforsar si esta debilitada y mas…No recuerdo el numero del SB… Esta muy obscuro el problema..
 

Dreamflyer

New Member
Me queda un deja-vu del accidente donde murió la Diva de La Banda, la inolvidable Paquita la del Barrio. También en un Learjet en condiciones dificiles de aclarar.
 

crlsrmrz

New Member
Última edición:

machnum

New Member
Es una pena! Esperemos que se encuentre la cause del accidente y todos aprendamos de esto….(ojo DGAC).. Este modelo de LEAR JET cuenta con un (SB) boletín de servicio para la columna de control.. Se tiene que renforsar si esta debilitada y mas…No recuerdo el numero del SB… Esta muy obscuro el problema..
El vuelo no alcanzo los 2000 pies y a partir de ahi fue un vuelo controlado con velocidad controlada hasta que cayeron en el mar, nada tiene que ver la columna de control, puedes ver las graficas que puse antes, ademas un piloto aviso de un engine failure, osea que la columna queda descartada
 

AeroPaco

New Member
Del Twitter de la NTSB.

@NTSB: Preliminary report now available for LearJet 35 accident, which occurred near Ft. Lauderdale on Nov. 19: http://t.co/hoH9BcMJmg

http://www.ntsb.gov/aviationquery/brief.aspx?ev_id=20131120X80518&key=1

NTSB Identification: ERA14FA045
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 19, 2013 in Fort Lauderdale, FL
Aircraft: LEARJET 35, registration: XA-USD
Injuries: 4 Fatal.
This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 19, 2013, at 1956 eastern standard time, a Learjet 35, Mexican registration XA-USD, operated by Aero JL SA de CV, was destroyed when it collided with the Atlantic Ocean after takeoff from Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL), Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The commercial pilot and a physician on board were lost and presumed fatally injured. The copilot and a flight nurse were fatally injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the positioning flight from FLL to Cozumel, Mexico.

The airplane had just completed an air ambulance flight for Air Evac International from San Jose, Costa Rica to FLL, and was repositioning back to its base in Cozumel, Mexico.

Preliminary voice and radar information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed the airplane had departed Runway 10 at approximately 1950, climbed straight ahead to an altitude of 2,200 feet, at an approximate groundspeed of 200 knots, when the pilot requested radar vectors back to runway 10L at FLL due to an "engine failure." The controller directed the pilot to maintain 4,000 feet and turn to a heading of 340 degrees. The pilot replied, "Not possible" and requested a 180-degree turn back to the airport.

At 19:52:34, the pilot declared a "mayday" and requested vectors back to FLL. Over the approximately three minutes that followed, the pilot requested vectors to the airport multiple times. While the pilot requested, received, and acknowledged additional radar vectors to the southwest from ATC to return to the airport, the airplane continued its slow turn and descent to the north. During the approximately two minutes that transpired after the pilot declared his intention to return to FLL, the airplane descended to 900 feet and slowed to140 knots as it flew northbound, parallel to the shoreline and away from FLL.

At 19:53:42, about 700 feet and 150 knots, the airplane initiated a left turn towards shore. The airplane continued its descending left turn until radar contact was lost at 100 feet and 150 knots on a southwesterly heading, at 19:55:42.

The pilot was issued a commercial pilot certificate by the government of Mexico, with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent medical certificate was issued August 22, 2013. According to the operator, the pilot had accrued 10, 091 total hours of flight experience, of which 1,400 hours were in the 30-series Learjet.

The copilot was issued a commercial pilot certificate by the government of Mexico, with ratings for airplane single-engine, airplane multiengine land and instrument airplane. His most recent medical certificate was issued on June 26, 2013. According to the operator, the copilot had accrued 1,235 total hours of flight experience, of which 175 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA and maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1979. Its most recent continuous airworthiness inspection was completed November 4, 2013, at 6,842 aircraft hours.

At 1953, the weather reported at Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL), located 6 miles southwest of the accident site included few clouds at 2,500 feet and a scattered layer at 6,500 feet. The wind was calm and visibility was 9 miles. The temperature was 23 degrees C, the dew point was 22 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 29.93 inches of mercury.

Wreckage was recovered from the ocean surface and taken to the U.S. Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale, Florida.. Examination by NTSB showed the wreckage contained exterior aircraft sheet metal skin, seat cushions, and luggage. The sheet metal skin showed no evidence of inflight or post-crash fire, and all fractures and tears were consistent with overload failure.
 

Guajolojet

Well-Known Member
Perdón, me confundí de Diva. Una disculpa sincera. Yo sé que son modelos similares en pesos y dimensiones como decimos en aeronáutica, pero aparentemente no con las mismas horas de vuelo.
confundiste pesos y dimensiones, pero si una de ellas es realmente cabina ancha.

737 vs L1011
 

FER

Well-Known Member
Alguien sabe si la NTSB ya emitio un comunicado oficial de las posibles causas de el accidente?
 

jor1

Active Member
Alguien sabe si la NTSB ya emitio un comunicado oficial de las posibles causas de el accidente?
Estimado FER, hasta el momento solo esta disponible el informe preliminar.

http://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20131120X80518&key=1

NTSB Identification: ERA14FA045
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Tuesday, November 19, 2013 in Fort Lauderdale, FL
Aircraft: LEARJET 35, registration: XA-USD


Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 19, 2013, at 1956 eastern standard time, a Learjet 35, Mexican registration XA-USD, operated by Aero JL SA de CV, was destroyed when it collided with the Atlantic Ocean after takeoff from Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL), Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The commercial pilot and a physician on board were lost and presumed fatally injured. The copilot and a flight nurse were fatally injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the positioning flight from FLL to Cozumel, Mexico.

The airplane had just completed an air ambulance flight for Air Evac International from San Jose, Costa Rica to FLL, and was repositioning back to its base in Cozumel, Mexico.

Preliminary voice and radar information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed the airplane had departed Runway 10 at approximately 1950, climbed straight ahead to an altitude of 2,200 feet, at an approximate groundspeed of 200 knots, when the pilot requested radar vectors back to runway 10L at FLL due to an "engine failure." The controller directed the pilot to maintain 4,000 feet and turn to a heading of 340 degrees. The pilot replied, "Not possible" and requested a 180-degree turn back to the airport.

At 19:52:34, the pilot declared a "mayday" and requested vectors back to FLL. Over the approximately three minutes that followed, the pilot requested vectors to the airport multiple times. While the pilot requested, received, and acknowledged additional radar vectors to the southwest from ATC to return to the airport, the airplane continued its slow turn and descent to the north. During the approximately two minutes that transpired after the pilot declared his intention to return to FLL, the airplane descended to 900 feet and slowed to140 knots as it flew northbound, parallel to the shoreline and away from FLL.

At 19:53:42, about 700 feet and 150 knots, the airplane initiated a left turn towards shore. The airplane continued its descending left turn until radar contact was lost at 100 feet and 150 knots on a southwesterly heading, at 19:55:42.

The pilot was issued a commercial pilot certificate by the government of Mexico, with ratings for airplane single- and multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent medical certificate was issued August 22, 2013. According to the operator, the pilot had accrued 10, 091 total hours of flight experience, of which 1,400 hours were in the 30-series Learjet.

The copilot was issued a commercial pilot certificate by the government of Mexico, with ratings for airplane single-engine, airplane multiengine land and instrument airplane. His most recent medical certificate was issued on June 26, 2013. According to the operator, the copilot had accrued 1,235 total hours of flight experience, of which 175 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA and maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1979. Its most recent continuous airworthiness inspection was completed November 4, 2013, at 6,842 aircraft hours.

At 1953, the weather reported at Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL), located 6 miles southwest of the accident site included few clouds at 2,500 feet and a scattered layer at 6,500 feet. The wind was calm and visibility was 9 miles. The temperature was 23 degrees C, the dew point was 22 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 29.93 inches of mercury.

Wreckage was recovered from the ocean surface and taken to the U.S. Coast Guard Station Fort Lauderdale, Florida.. Examination by NTSB showed the wreckage contained exterior aircraft sheet metal skin, seat cushions, and luggage. The sheet metal skin showed no evidence of inflight or post-crash fire, and all fractures and tears were consistent with overload failure.
 

FER

Well-Known Member
Jor1 ni hablar amigo gracias.. Ojala que se encuentre a los responsables en caso de un mal mantenimiento en el equipo..

Una pena lo que sucedio con esta aeronave y su tripulacion..
 

Manual FLEX

Active Member
Ahí está el resultado. Lástima que se llevaron a dos con ellos.

Operadores chuecos, pilotos chuecos, inspectores de la DGAC chuecos. Ojalá se hubieran llevado a los inspectores y jefes con ellos...
 

diego727

Member
La misma historia de siempre, pilotos sin el adiestramiento adecuado y con licencias chuecas. De qué sirve tener que sacar un título y cédula "profesional" que no sirven para nada si se van a estar anotando las horas y sacando las capacidades chuecas en escuelas patito?

No les sirvió con el accidente de Mouriño, sigue pasando lo mismo...igual que el ejemplo del Learjet de Jenny Rivera, como en muchos aviones con matrícula November donde los copilotos andan sin capacidad, se suben a un Lear y al día siguiente a un Sabre o un Citation, sólo con el famoso endorsement siendo esto ilegal ya que sólo aplica en vuelos dentro de Estados Unidos, y aún así no se me hace lo mejor que sólo con eso se pueda volar de SIC allá...ahí la FAA y la DGAC ya deberían de haber tomado cartas en el asunto desde hace mucho tiempo.

Pero ahí está el resultado, ni listas hicieron, ni procedimientos de emergencia, deberían de cambiar cómo y dónde se toman los adiestramientos, no sólo en trámites burocráticos sin sentido...

Saludos
 
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